Heritage River Birch

Botanical Name: Betula nigra ‘Cully,’ Betula nigra ‘Heritage’

Alternate Name: Betula nigra ‘Cully’ Heritage River Birch

The Heritage River Birch is a fast growing, graceful, medium-sized deciduous tree. It is prized for its eye-catching reddish brown, exfoliating bark, which reveals lighter silver-tan bark underneath. This tree can be grown as either a multi-trunked or standard tree. The Heritage River Birch tree is the most adaptable birch tree to different environmental conditions and grows easily in moist to wet conditions.

This tree is also known by the botanical names Betula nigra ‘Cully’ and Betula nigra ‘Heritage.’ It can tolerate some standing water, and is therefore suited for growing in rain gardens or next to streams or ponds. It can also be planted in lower parts of the landscape where there is seasonal flooding and bad drainage.

The leaves are handsome and dark green. They grow in a diamond-shape with serrated edges and are leathery in texture, ranging from 1.5-3.5 inches in length. Their fall color is a reliable bright yellow. The male flowers are brown catkins, and the female flowers are smaller and green.

Betula nigra ‘Cully’ Heritage River Birch is resistant to leaf spot disease that can afflict birch trees. It is also extremely resistant to the bronze birch borer which has been responsible for killing many silver birch trees in the Pacific Northwest. This birch cultivar is also very heat tolerant and somewhat drought and pollution tolerant.

Category:

Height: 40-70 ft.

Width: 40-60 ft.

Shape: Pyramidal when young, round when matures

Flower Color: Brown (male), Green (female)

Flowering Time: April-May

Fall Color: Bright Yellow

Features: Beautiful reddish brown & silver-tan exfoliating bark

Exposure: Full Sun to Part Shade

Watering: Moderate/Heavy & Regular

Soil: Prefers rich and moist, slightly acidic soil. Tolerates wet and clay soil.

Growth Rate: Fast

USDA Zones: 5-9

Uses: Specimen tree, shade tree, rain gardens, next to ponds, streams or planted in low areas, areas with a high water table/occasional flooding, mass plantings

Similar trees: Betula utilis 'Jacquemontii'